Phaethon, Ovid’s Metamorphosis, illustrated and published by Ross Braught, 1935. SIGNED

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Braught, Ross. Self Published by Ross Braught, 1935.
English, SIGNED limited edition #52/100, Very Good + folio measuring 11 1/8”x 14”, unpaginated

Very Good + folio with cream buckram over boards, blindstamped border to front panel, gilt title to spine, single band of gilt at head and foot. Some minor foxing and mild soiling to spine and board edges, tightly bound, sharp tips, no bumping, clean interior. Comes in a Fair/ Poor illustrated slipcase, cardboard back completely separated from box but present, still functions in that it protects the book. This volume contains nine two-page full-bleed original lithographs and thirteen full-page original lithographs, most of the images drawn in the Badlands of South Dakota and the Grand Canyon. Printed on heavy stock cream paper with type in gray ink. A limited edition of 100, this copy numbered 52 and signed by Braught in black pen. Text in English, composite from Joseph Addison and John Dryden’s translations of Ovid’s Metamorphosis. Hand typeset and printed by The Lowell Press, bound by H. Engel & Son. 

Laid in loose is a letter on Cleveland Museum of Art letterhead from Henry Adams, art historian at Cleveland Museum of Art/Case Western Reserve University, who has authored some of the most respected books on Thomas Hart Benton and Thomas Eakins. The letter is addressed to Ellen G. Landau, professor of art history at Cleveland Museum of Art/Case Western Reserve University who was involved in the famous Jackson Pollock authentication controversy in 2005. Adams explains that she might like this book because Braught is "not quite as ridiculously macho as Rockwell Kent". Apparently, Adams found several copies of this rare book that had been sitting in a barn for fifty years in Pennsylvania. 

Ross Braught was a teacher at Kansas City Art Institute, a contemporary of Thomas Hart Benton who considered Braught to be the "greatest living draughtsman in America." His style combines Art Deco and romantic imagery with the Regionalist landscape approach.  Rare in the trade. 

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